Newfangled works with independent agencies to create lead development web platforms for their clients.

Newfangled works with independent agencies to create lead development web platforms for their clients.

Book Report: Don't Make Me Think



It's true that designing for the web can be a tough transition for the print designer. There are a number of technical limitations and physical differences between designing for paper and designing for the screen. There is a lack of precision that can be frustrating for designers that are used to controlling kerning between letters and the rag of a block of text. Some of our previous newsletters call attention to some of these differences and provide tips on avoiding some pitfalls and considering aspects of design that are unique to web sites. Of course, given the length of a newsletter we can't be very comprehensive in addressing such issues. However, many books out there can be even more helpful. There are so many in fact, that finding a good one can be quite difficult. Most of the "learn how to design a web site" books out there consist mainly of technical directions on how to properly format a .gif or compress a jpeg. They get into tips and tricks in HTML coding and browser compatibility. It's been my experience that most print designers have neither the time, nor the inclination to absorb such detail. There is one book out there that I highly recommend for any designer. It goes much deeper than the superficial mechanics of building a web page and addresses the much more important matters of good information design. It's called, Don't Make Me Think by Steve Krug.







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